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The billboard company emphasizes healthy soils

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Warning: ‘Farming Naked’ is not a good idea when creating resilient fields

A new campaign with billboards, the Land Stewardship Project (LSP), which promotes healthy soil on southern Minnesota farms, uses vivid photos, inspirational quotes and, in the case of one sign, a bit of obscene humor to understand the benefits of using rotary crops. grazing, unemployment and a variety of crop rotations to create resilient, biologically healthy soil. (Photo courtesy)

LEWISTON, MINNESOTA – When is farming not a good idea? The new Land Stewardship Project (LSP), which promotes healthy soil on farms in southern Minnesota, answers this and many other questions.

The billboards, which debuted this month near the communities of Minnesota in Austin, Spring Valley, Fountain, Preston, Dexter, Grand Meadow and Minnesota City, feature vivid photos, inspirational quotes and, in the case of one sign, a bit of obscene humor. to understand the benefits of using cover crops, controlled rotational grazing, idleness and a variety of sevarat to create resilient, biologically healthy soil.

Sean Snother, who runs the LSP’s soil protection program, said the campaign was inspired by eight farmers who are members of the Soil Network’s steering committee. The network of soil builders consists of more than 800 farmers and others located throughout southern Minnesota, as well as in northeastern Iowa and southwestern Wisconsin. Network members regularly gather together through field days, seminars, pastures and calls to Zoom to discuss different ways to build profitable soil.

This interaction between farmers combined with other efforts by government agencies and nonprofits has led to an increase in the number of hectares in the region managed using methods such as cover. Over the past five years, Minnesota’s acreage has increased nearly 42 percent to 579,147 acres, according to the U.S. Census of Agriculture. According to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture report for 2020, most of the counties in southeastern Minnesota in the heart of the LSP network of soil builders demonstrate the use of cover crops on more than 10% of farms.

“This increase in the use of healthy soil practices is not accidental,” Snout said. “There is no doubt that farmers are inspired by other farmers and learn from them best when it comes to innovative methods such as cover crops and rotary grazing.” She added that despite an impressive increase in the use of soil construction practices, a total of only about 3% of Minnesota’s farmland is regularly cultivated. “We have much more opportunities for growth when it comes to acres that will benefit from this practice. As the growing season of 2022 approaches, we hope that these billboards will promote more connections between farmers who are looking to make a profit by building soil. ”

In one case, a billboard located near Austin could also cause a little laughter. The sign, which was posted in collaboration with practical Iowa farmers, depicts the farmer’s bare feet and the phrase, “Don’t go barefoot on the farm: plant cover crops.”

“Part of the message we are trying to convey is that creating healthy soil is not only good for the land and the farmer’s income, but is also an interesting way to take control and increase sustainability when it comes to growing crops and livestock.” “,” Snaiter said.

For more information on profitable soil health building and viewing billboard images, see https://landstewardshipproject.org/soil-health.

– Land management project


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