Agriculture

Is it time to reassess the production standards for organic dairy products? | 2021-06-09

Chicago — Consumer attitudes towards the use of antibiotics to treat sick animals may be evolving. As a result of the study, it was published in the May 2021 issue of “How Does Public Awareness of the Use of Antibiotics on Dairy Farms Contribute to Self-reported Organic Purchases?” Food science journal It can change the use of antibiotics in organic livestock.

When dairy cows get sick on traditional organic farms, federal regulations require farmers to provide treatment, including antibiotics, as needed. The challenge for organic farmers is that cows that have been given antibiotics will never be able to return to organic farming. In traditional agriculture, cows given antibiotics are allowed to return the cows to the herd if the milk test does not detect the antibiotics.

“The United States regulates the use of antibiotics in the agricultural environment to address the global problem of antibiotic resistance,” said a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University’s School of Veterinary Medicine and Diagnostic Science, Ithaca. One Ece Bulut said. Principal Investigator of 1,000 random adult telephone surveys conducted in NY and 2018.

This study investigated the perceptions of Americans about the use of antibiotics in organic dairy and dairy farms and whether that perception influences consumers’ self-reported organic buying behavior. One of the goals was to begin a discussion of the values ​​and conflicts that shape the use of antibiotics in the current dairy system.

The results showed that participants’ knowledge of antibiotic use practices in dairy did not affect self-reported purchasing behavior of organic or traditional dairy products. However, respondents familiar with the regulation of antibiotic use in dairy are likely to oppose US organic standards for the use of antibiotics in dairy, and past antibiotic use was organic in cattle. I thought the position should not be removed forever.

Dairy cow“Our study has shown that the general public in the United States does not fully understand the regulations on the use of antibiotics in dairy cows,” said Dr. Brutt. “The most important feature of consumers who self-reported that they purchased organic dairy products instead of traditional dairy products was an increase in household income. Participants who self-reported organic purchases more often were themselves. There was a strong tendency to prioritize health in the dairy industry. Knowledge of antibiotic usage practices in dairy farming did not appear to affect the buying behavior of organic and traditional dairy products. These findings did not affect US dairy products. It may start rebuilding the organic market. “

Farmers around the world are trying to reduce the use of animal antibiotics. For organic farmers, that is now very clear. The results of the study suggest that the opportunity to properly treat sick cattle with antibiotics may be possible in a more sustainable way for organic farming. This eventually involves returning the cows to the organic milking group. This can make organics more attractive to farmers and help meet the growing demand for organic dairy products.

“Understanding consumer purchasing motivations for dairy products helps to continually ensure a variety of dairy production systems to accommodate these diverse consumer choices.” Federation, Arlington, Virginia. state. “The conclusion of this study that’Americans do not fully understand the regulations on the use of antibiotics in dairy cows’ is not surprising and is consistent with the results of other studies.

“Our study has shown that the general public in the United States does not fully understand the regulations on the use of antibiotics in dairy cows.” — Dr. Ece Bulut, Cornell University

“This study reveals that’the use of antibiotics for the treatment of illness becomes more acceptable’as the understanding of regulations on the use of antibiotics grows, the results show that more consumption. Suggests that one recognizes the importance of antibiotics in animal health and welfare. “

All US milk must be tested for antibiotics prior to processing, as required by the US Food and Drug Administration through the Grade A Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. The FDA reports antibiotic test results for milk, and by 2020, only 0.010% of all milk in the United States had no antibiotic residue.

“In the United States, all milk that tests positive for residual antibiotics is discarded,” John Carr said.

Dr. Brutt said: From our research, better understanding seems to be related to increased acceptance of the use of antibiotics for the treatment of diseases in the organic dairy industry. “

https://www.foodbusinessnews.net/articles/18820-is-it-time-to-reevaluate-organic-dairy-production-standards Is it time to reassess the production standards for organic dairy products? | 2021-06-09

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