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Explainer: What is the history of the Olympic protest rules? | World



File-In this October 17, 2018 file photo, a statue honoring former Olympic athlete Tommie Smith is on the left, and John Carlos can be seen on the San Jose State University campus in San Jose, California. Smith and Carlos raised black-a gloved fist while the national anthem was playing at the 200-meter medal ceremony at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. Rule 50 of the IOC Charter states: Venue and other areas. “


Tony Averer


EDDIE PELLSAP National Writer

Tokyo (AP) — The simple act of kneeling felt more monumental when it happened at the Japanese Olympic soccer field on the first night of action.

Women’s team players from the United States, Sweden, Chile, the United Kingdom and New Zealand knelt before the match on Wednesday night and made anti-racist gestures never seen before on the Olympic stage. They considered the three-week stay in Tokyo to be the first of many of this type of demonstration.

Olympic rules prohibiting such demonstrations at the Olympics have been hotly debated and contested for decades, and those issues have reached a flash point in the last two years. As a result, the rules have changed and some sports organizations have become more motivated to enforce them.

How have the protests and demonstrations at the convention evolved over the years? Here is a brief summary.

What: The Olympics have always claimed themselves as a non-political entity designed to unite the nation to celebrate sports and international unity. One of the most recognized symbols of that non-political ideal is the ban on “propaganda” at conventions. Rule 50 of the IOC Charter states that “Olympic venues, venues and other areas are not permitted to demonstrate or promote politically, religiously or racially of any kind.”

WHO: The ideal of the rules was most prominently tested before it was officially enshrined in the Olympic Charter. American sprinters Tommy Smith and John Carlos raised their black gloved fists during the national anthem at the 200-meter medal ceremony at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. He was banished from the Olympic movement for nearly half a century. Until 2016, the US Olympic Committee did not take them to official events. Until 2019, it didn’t enshrine them in its Fame Hall of Fame.

https://fremonttribune.com/news/world/explainer-whats-the-history-of-the-olympics-protest-rule/article_35ad5850-42da-58db-9795-20c6e0a9d411.html Explainer: What is the history of the Olympic protest rules? | World

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